Norway

By Chandrashekar (Chandra) Tamirisa, (On Twitter) @c_tamirisa

Flattr this

The land of peace has been blown by “dynamite” on a Friday, the sacred day for Muslims worldwide, as if the Moors have crept along the Atlantic Coast of Europe, beginning in Spain, then France, then England and now into Norway.

As American media on NBC is analyzing, all the reasons for the bombing point to the opening salvo by Ayman Al Zawahiri, the new leader of Al Qaeda, since the killing of Bin Laden by the United States in Abbottabad, Pakistan, earlier this year. Especially since the Peace Prize was awarded to U.S president Barack Hussein Obama, a Unitarian Christian, in 2009, it appears that radical Muslims, aligned with Al Qaeda, do not like Norwegian support for the United States in Afghanistan.

Norway is a major, non-OPEC, oil producer and exporter similar to the Russian Federation. A member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and not a member of the European Union (EU), but for global oil prices, Norway is untouched by the politics of oil which has besieged America since the oil shocks of the ‘70s and President Nixon’s Project Independence of 1973. Therefore, Norway’s role, as the once Viking warlord nation, in acknowledging contributions to the harmony among the world’s peoples may have come into question since the 9/11 attacks on the United States.

That clean energy, unlike in the United States, despite the historical conflicts between the Ottomans and the Holy Roman Empire after the fall of Byzantium, has become the leitmotif of Europe west of Russia, whatever may be the oil interests of either England or Norway which share the oil spoils in the North and Norwegian seas, is sufficient reason to believe that the plight of Muslims worldwide is touching the hearts and minds of everyday Europeans to advance the fundamentalist agenda of Islamic militancy, locally and globally. The converse of the same phenomenon, NATO fundamentalism, is COIN, or counter-insurgency in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Europe, culturally wealthy and varied, similar to much of Asia and Africa, the old worlds, prefers to keep its cultures by co-existing with those of others, including the Muslims, in their own lands. Every single European effort, including Desertec led by Germany, is working toward the energy self-sufficiency, by diversifying energy sources to be independent from oil and gas exporters, including Russia. The European peoples, therefore, do not want Western aggression in Muslim countries, just as many Americans are also tired of a decade-long conflict after 9/11 which has largely been self-induced by the West since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979.

Afghanistan has no oil, but it has lithium, the element that powers batteries in all electronic devices, including all-electric zero emissions vehicles (ZEVs) such as Tesla Motors (partially-owned by Daimler-Benz of Germany). This “necessary war”, as Obama spoke when he received his peace prize in Oslo, is not as much about the oil politics of 9/11 and the past as it is about access to the mineral wealth under the ground, Lithium and rare earths, for the future of the West and the rest of the world. It is about other forms of energy and communications, whose unlimited and inexpensive supply is imperative for the sustenance of civilization.

Lithium, if Afghanistan is non-militant and stable, as Afghan president Hamid Karzai well understands, can help the Afghan tribes stay united, and to dispense with their warlordism, to prosper than grow poppy in Khandhahar.

Natural resources in Islamic countries need not be a curse. They can be a boon if, locally and globally, they are efficiently leveraged by their peoples (and enabled to do so by foreigners), just as Norway did its oil.

Advertisements

About Chandrashekar (Chandra) Tamirisa

http://www.thecommonera.com/Common_Era/Me.html
This entry was posted in Economics, Energy and Natural Resources, Foreign Policy, North America and Caribbean, Politics, Russia and Eastern Europe, Transformations LLC, Turkey, Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s